Flipgrid

I came across Flipgrid yesterday which is a video discussion platform that describes itself as ‘Where social learning happens’ (Flipgrid HomePage https://info.flipgrid.com/)

Basically you create a grid and a topic and then people can share short video responses and comment on each others video. You can have moderated comments and change the length of clips.

I think this could have lots of potential so I’ve been having a play around with it… if you have used Flipgrid for learning and teaching please let me know as I am convinced it would be useful for all sorts of things …. I was thinking staff development and community building, events, all sorts of things…

 

There is a helpful link on the site to many ( or as we say in Wales ‘tumps of’) ways that it could be used

So anyway here is one I prepared earlier ….I tried to embed it below but it wouldnt let me so here is the link and a screen shot …

https://flipgrid.com/53a2d1

Flipgrid test

Deb definitely loves a badge …

Well I have been sprucing up my blog and have added the fab new digital badge available for Association for Learning Technology members. Now all I need is to get my CMALT badge and I will be a happy bunny ….

You can download yours here

materials

Week 1 Activity 3 : How much changed when printing arrived?

Thanks, Gutenberg – but we’re too pressed for time to read

http://www.theguardian.com/media/2008/jan/27/internet.pressandpublishing

  • What strikes you as interesting?

Mmm … I liked this article … well I did until I tried to look up the link it mentions in to the study by the British Library and researchers at University College London. The link to the study which the article says is available from tinyurl.com/2eslnr seems to reach a dead link … now it could just be me and my little old computer perhaps but if it isn’t me and if the link truly is dead then this might well provide another aspect to the ‘power browsing’ and quick wins referred to in the article – did I bother trying to get to the study after my fruitless effort ? Well no …. will I look it up at some point in the future ? Possibly but probably not … Could I just be satisfied with reading (skimming) the summary info provided in the article (for a quick win) rather than looking at the study directly ? Probably ….  certainly food for thought on the old surface / deep learning debate 🙂

2015-02-13_2027_guternberg

  • How clear do you find the argument about the First Law of Technology – for example, the point about overestimating?

Well I could see where he was going with it, but I found that I needed more information in relation to where this ‘law’ had come from and whether there were any other laws that went with it … so I guess from the article itself , only a hint of the underlying principles of the laws of technology was given and therefore no I dont think it was particularly clear.

A quick google of this later gave several results eventually leading me to this blog post by Michael Sacasas which I found quite accessible to read and this gives a useful summary of all six laws of technology which have become known as Kranzberg’s Laws ….well that is assuming that I have stumbled upon the correct set of laws ….

(http://thefrailestthing.com/2011/08/25/kranzbergs-six-laws-of-technology-a-metaphor-and-a-story/)

2015-02-13_2109_six_laws_of_technology_

Kranzberg, Melvin (1986) Technology and History: “Kranzberg’s Laws”, Technology and Culture, Vol. 27, No. 3, pp. 544-560.

http://www.jstor.org/stable/3105385

I also found this useful video on You Tube by Connor Owens which gives a useful overview …